4 Styles of Japanese Martial Arts

Modern styles of self-defense and competitive fighting owe a large debt of gratitude to the various Japanese martial arts styles. Except for the Chinese martial arts, known collectively as Kung Fu, it is the highly formalized forms of Japanese martial arts that dominate action movies and neighborhood gymnasiums. 

The four most common styles of Japanese martial arts are aikido, iaido, judo, and karate. A brief introduction to each follows. 
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Another masterclass with Semmy Schilt this weekend

Kickboxing legend Semmy Schilt will once again enter your homes and give you some valuable lessons. The elite fighting organization SENSHI gives you the opportunity to train with the four-time World Heavyweight Champion in K-1. This will happen this Saturday 30th May, at 10:00 a.m. Bulgarian time (EET)/ 9:00 a.m. (CET).

Semmy Schilt

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KWU Summer Camp 2020

Dear friends and colleagues!

As you know, Kyokushin World Union and the Bulgarian Karate Kyokushin Federation have planned to hold the XIV KWU International Camp in Kamchia (Bulgaria) from July 5 to July 12, 2020.

Due to the world pandemic of COVID19 only participants of 16 y.o. and above are allowed to participate in the XIV KWU International Summer Camp. Champions and prize-winners of international championships and tournaments, as well as champions and prize-winners of national championships are allowed.

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Release Your Mind!

Gichin Funakoshi was not the greatest karateka of all time.

This might come as a surprise to many who train in Japanese karate, who have come to regard Funakoshi (1868-1957) as the most towering figure in the art, the man who brought it from the countryside of Okinawa to Japan and the man who oversaw its introduction to the rest of the world. But it’s true. While Funakoshi was a central figure in those accomplishments, we know that there were others — some with more experience in karate than he had — who also contributed.
 
 
We also know that a primary reason Funakoshi was promoted to bring karate to mainland Japan was the fact that he was well-educated and able to communicate with the Japanese at a level that wouldn’t lead to his dismissal as an uncouth hillbilly — which is how many Japanese regarded Okinawans back then. So it’s reasonable to remove Funakoshi, gently, from his pedestal and view him in a more realistic light. However, in doing so, we should avoid going too far in reducing his stature. He wasn’t a saint. He was, though, a remarkable figure.

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